Station of Neapolis

Nike

Nike
Nike

Nike

The statue was found at via A. Scaloia in Naples in 1893 during the demolition of the Church of Sant’Agata agli Orefici for the town reorganization.
The marble statue might date back to the Flavian period or the early decades of the first century AD.
The Nike (a figure of Greek mythology, personification of victory), headlessand wingless, is stepping forward on a rocky ground, with her left arm hanging positioned by the side of her body in order to hold an attribute(a palm tree?)placedon a base in a quadrangular embedding, and with her right armraised to hold probably a crown. She is wearing a chiton (tunic) and a himation (cloak) with an apoptygma (a sort of shawl) around her waist. On her back are dowels and holes originally used to hold the wings.
It is a Roman reproduction of good execution inspired by Greek models of the end of the fifth century BC, in particular by the Nike created by Paionios for the sanctuary of Olympia.

Testa del princioe giulio-claudio

Nero Caesar

Testa del princioe giulio-claudio

Nero Caesar

The marble portrait, which was recovered at Piazza Nicola Amore during the excavation works for the underground of Naples in 2004, dates to the second quarter of the first century AD.
The statue depicts a young man with his head slightly bent to the left. The surviving facial features highlight the close relationship with his father Germanicus, Tiberius’ nephew, who adopted him in the fourth century AD at the behest of Augustus and destined him to the succession. The characteristics of the hairstyle, which, with the institution of Principality, distinguish the portraits of the members of the imperial Julio-Claudian family, seem to be attributable to one of Germanicus’ sons, probably to the eldest one, whose name was Nero Caesar (6-) AD).
The movement of the head and the complete finishing of the back side suggest that the portrait waspertaining to a statue of ideal type, a reproduction of an athletic or heroic model, which would find a plausible place in the architectonic context of discovery.

kantharos

Painted pottery kantharos
kantharos

Painted pottery kantharos

The object, which was recovered at Piazza Municipio during the excavation works for the underground of Naples in 2004, dates back to the end of the fourth century or the beginning of the third century BC.
The kantharos presents a flared edge, a bilobate bodywith a lower ribbed basin defined on the upper part by a double flute, handles with circular sections extending above the brim, a stem-shaped foot. The wall of the upper basin bears the trace of a white painted inscription. The text written in Greek unfolds with a linear and progressive character and can be read ΑΓ[ΑΤ]ΟΚΛΕΟΣ ΣΩΤΗΙΡΟΣ (AgatoklesSoteiros).
An X is engravedat the joint of the handles.

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