Collections

sezione - egizia
Collection of Epigraphs
A unique collection of written records of ancient pre-Roman languages from Central and Southern Italy, it also includes several inscriptions from Vesuvian towns. Among the most valuable inscriptions are those containing the texts of laws, decrees, public and private documents, calendars and religious dedications. The Orphic gold tablets from Thurii and the bronze tablets from Heraclea are considered particularly remarkable.

Collection of Epigraphs 
Farnese collection
It is the richest collection of antiquities made during the Renaissance period and the only one preserved intact over the centuries. Started by Pope Paul III by the mid-16th century and significantly enriched by his nephew, Cardinal Alexander, the collection came to Naples thanks to Charles III of Bourbon, the son of Elizabeth Farnese, last descendant of the family. In different rooms are displayed homogeneous groups of sculptures which decorated the Farnese palaces in Rome, together with those unearthed at the Baths of Caracalla. Not to be missed are the colossal statue of Hercules and the marble group of the Bull, the Tyrannicides, the Ephesian Artemis, the busts of the Roman emperors, the Venus Kallipygia and several portraits of scholars and philosophers, including Homer
and Socrates. The collection also includes an extraordinary repertoire of gemstones, which boasts more than 1500 items and a great variety of materials. The Farnese cup is a true masterpiece made of sardonyx: the greatest gemstone of antiquity, which passed through the hands of the most illustrious collectors in history, from the Medici family down to the Farnese. The collection also included paintings and pieces of furniture, which were moved to the Museum of Capodimonte in 1957.
Farnese collection 
numismatica
Coins and medals
This is one of the largest and most valuable coin collections in the world, built up around the original Farnese collection and enriched with specimens from private collections and archaeological discoveries. It spans the history of coinage in Southern Italy from the 6th century BC down to the Bourbon period. Two rooms house the coins from Pompeii and document the economic activities of the city through frescoes, sculptures, jewels and writing instruments.
Coins and medals 
corridori
Villa dei papiri
These extraordinary bronze and marble statues were intended as decorations for a luxurious villa in Herculaneum, explored with a system of tunnels between 1750 and 1761. The Villa dei Papyri owes its name to the discovery in it of nearly 2,000 papyrus scrolls, mainly consisting of philosophical texts written in Greek. The building is considered one of the best examples of Roman villas devoted to a Greek lifestyle that were scattered around the coast of Campania.
Villa dei papiri
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